Ida Wells-Barnett

Title

Ida Wells-Barnett

Subject

Civil rights

Description

Female editor and inspiration for the anti-lynching campaign of the NAACP

Creator

Amy French

Source

Image: photo by Mary Garrity, public domain

Birth Date

1862

Birthplace

Holly Springs, Mississippi, USA

Death Date

1931

Occupation

Journalist and editor

Biographical Text

Wells-Barnett was born a slave and rose to become a journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, and civil rights leader. An activist for civil rights for women and people of color, her writings exposed racial and sexual discrimination. Two of her pamphlets were quite influential, Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Parts and A Red Record, 1892-1894, both of which described lynching and the struggle of black people since emancipation. Her protest influenced the NAACP to take up an anti-lynching campaign. She was actively engaged in women's clubs and formed the Women's  Era Club, the first civic organization for African-American women. In 1896, she founded the National Association of Colored Women. A suffragist, she fought to make sure that women of all races secured the vote.

Bibliography

Davidson, James West. 'They say': Ida B. Wells and the Reconstruction of Race. (Oxford University Press, 2009).

Schecter, Patricia. Ida B. Wells-Barnett and American Reform,  1880-1930. (University of North Carolina Press, 2001).

The Works of Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Gutenberg Press: http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/w#a5765

Files

420px-Mary_Garrity_-_Ida_B._Wells-Barnett_-_Google_Art_Project_-_restoration_crop.png

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Date Added
June 11, 2014
Collection
Reform (Social or Labor)
Item Type
Person
Tags
, , ,
Citation
Amy French, “Ida Wells-Barnett,” Women Who Dared, accessed August 18, 2018, https://womenwhodared.omeka.net/items/show/32.